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to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
by the president where u.s. military participation here would end. >>> plus, a troubling turn in japan. workers are pulled from the crippled reactor complex after smoke is seen rising from two of the reactors overnight. how big a setback is this? >>> it's monday, march 21st, 2011. i'm willie geist. chuck and savannah are traveling with the president in south america. we will hear from them later this hour. >>> let's get right to the run down, we begin with operation odyssey dawn in libya. punishing air strikes drove pro-gadhafi forces further from home base last night though it is unclear where gadhafi is at this hour. rebels celebrated after u.s., british and french planes demolished libyan tanks and took out air defenses. overnight the opposition said it had regained almost 40 miles of territory. colonel gadhafi appears to have escaped harm in the attack on his administration building. he has though warned of a long war and said he'd open up the government's arsenal to arm his supporters. >>> on sunday defense secretary robert gates reiterated that the u.s. has no plans to send in ground forc
clear that no u.s. boots will be on the ground in libya but how long air strikes by u.s. pilots will continue is on everyone's mind right now. those strikes, which include six more tomahawk missile strike have led to a rapid sweep of forces east to west. in the past 49 hours, rebels from taken key towns and striking at sirte, as we speak, the hometown of moammar gadhafi. nbc's chuck todd live at white house here. some of the president's critic says he should have given the speech that we're expecting tonight before the strikes began. >> reporter: well, look, there was even some debate among some supporters of the president on that very notion. but that's -- that's not going to happen. you can't turn back the clock. so the decision was made. they would wait until there was -- they were done with the u.s. portion of this. and so, it's not a mere coincidence that when the handover to nato to run this no-fly zone is taking place, that the president is going to use the occasion to both make the case for why he made this decision, number one, and number two, it's going to be valedicto
shattered by a new round of gunfire that follows a weekend of u.s. led air strikes. president obama answering questions this afternoon for the first time since sending our fighter jets into action. >> the core principle that has to be upheld here is that when the entire international community, almost unanimously, says that there is a potential humanitarian crisis about to take place that a leader who has lost his legitimacy decides to turn his military on his own people, that we can't simply stand by with empty words. >> one of this weekend's bombings badly damaged president gadhafi's compound. pro-gadhafi forces opened fire on a crowd of rebels in mizratah today killing nine of them gaining control of that area seen as critical for gadhafi on a strategic level. what is happening in libya? the latest headline from the uprisingings throughout the middle east look like this away from libya. yemen also in crisis right now. the president is losing his grip on power. he dissolved his cabinet over the weekend but for the growing groups of protesters that's not enough. some of the members
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
of the union with candy crowley" starts right now. >>> why in the world is the u.s. military involved in libya? republicans are the toughest critics. there are echos inside the democratic party. >> i really don't believe that we have an obligation to get involved in every single occurrence in that part of the world. >> the immediate thing congress needs to do when it returns is to cut off any funds for containing libya. >> in a statement senator j. rockefeller wrote of serious concerns. our military and budget are stretched thin fighting two wars already. and i want to avoid getting into another conflict with unknown cost and consequences. tomorrow night, the president addresses the nation. today, a muddled mission against gadhafi. we talked to armed services carl levin and chaos throughout the mideast with former national security adviser stephen hadley and the former head of the cia, general michael hayden. and then assessing growing concern over japan's nuclear disaster with nuclear analyst joseph sorincioni and the impact on this with economist alice rivlin and douglas holtz aiken. i'm can
. >>> in chile, president obama tried to clarify. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> senators on both sides of the aisle are concerned about the end game. >> if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. >> we do not have a clear diplomatic policy or a clear statement of foreign policy that is accompanying this military operation. >> there is a growing rift in the coalition over who should be in control. >> no apparent cooperation. some people want to turn it over to nato, the maiamericans and t brits. >> french president ruffled feathers by announcing publicly that french fighters were in the air before his international counterparts were briefed. whoever is in control, arizona republican senator john mccain says, there is only one way to end it. >> a stalemate is a very, very badout come. american policy is that gadhafi must go. >>> a naval facility was hit overnight east of tripoli. robert gates is in moscow. gates says gadhafi is misleading the russia
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
is at the white house. jim, let's begin with you in the pentagon now. what is the u.s. military saying about the report that a french jet attacked and destroyed a libyan aircraft? >> well, there were all sorts of conflicting reports from the beginning after a french pilot radioed in to the command aboard the mt. whitney, the u.s. command ship out there in the mediterranean that he had shot down a libyan war plane. at the time, u.s. officials said they could not confirm it and continued to check, but subsequently, it turns out, and again, these are still conflicting reports, that apparently this french pilot shot a libyan airplane of some kind, whether it was a war plenty, whether it was a air,r enivia ple,has tve e, it landed at misratah or was already on the ground. now, of course, what made the first reports very significant is that would have been the first libyan aircraft, military, that would have challenged this no-fly zone. because not a single helicopter or libyan war plane has been in the sky since the u.s. and coalition war planes started to enforce that no-fly zone. but also, beca
in jerusalem killed one person and wounded more than 50. israel's ambassador to the u.s. says that the bombing does not appear related to militants' recent rocket attacks on southern israel. >>> defense secretary robert gates met with his israeli counterpart in tel aviv today. and he is urging the israelis to restart peace negotiations with the palestinians. defense officials say that gates believes israel can get ahead of the pop ulous wave across the middle east by pressing a peace deal. >>> and hundreds of potential jurors are at the los angeles county courthouse today. 12 will be chosen to decide whether michael jackson's doctor goes to prison. dr. conrad murray is charged with giving jackson an overdose of an anesthetic. opening statements in the trial are set for may. >>> now more for our top story. there are safety concerns at reagan national airport. after two pilots were unable to reach the control tower before landing. our sandra endo is in washington with details. first of all, sandra, the flight landed safely, but there's still so many questions here. the real issue, why the contro
a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according to u.s. officials, coalition strikes have successfully crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no-fly zone is effectively in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's tripoli compound last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown. he has vowed to fight a long, drawn out war with western forces. making the rounds on the sunday talk shows, admiral mike mullen stressed that the u.s. role in libya would be limited but he did not give an exact date of how long the u.s. would remain involved. >> there's no one that understands better than i that the stress and the strain that we've been under for a long time in our tenth year of war, both in iraq and in afghanistan. that said, we are within our capability and capacity to be able to execute this mission. the directions have been given to me, it is limited. it is very focused and in that regard, we're more than able, as has been shown
>>> making news in america this morning -- >> the u.s. gets ready to hand off the mission in libya, after president obama makes his case to the nation, that military intervention was necessary. >>> from california, a sliding hillside puts homes in danger. families told to get out before their houses tumbled down. >>> and the drastic measures taken by one teen who wanted a new car. wait until you hear what she did to get it. >>> and good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us today. president obama takes his case for military action against libya on the road today. it will be part of a major speech that mr. obama gives later today. >> right here in new york. >> and last night, the president spoke to the nation to defend his choices and also to announce that nato will take over the lead role tomorrow. emily schmidt is joining us from washington with all the details. good morning, emily. >> reporter: peggy and rob, good morning to you. before president obama used the word libya last night, he said the words international effort. and he said the world had had a responsibility to a
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
of that u.s. fighter jet and we are happy to report both crew members are safe and in u.s. hands. we are covering the angles from the points on the map. nic robertson in tripoli and chris lawrence at the pentagon and retired navy captain alec frazier is here at the cnn center. chris, what is the pentagon saying about this? >> reporter: well, they are saying, bottom line, carol, is that both of these crew members are now off libyan soil and safely back in u.s. hands, but the story of how they got there, is just fascinating. this crew took off from a base in italy overnight and they were on a strike mission. in other words, they weren't necessarily just patrolling. this was a fighter jet specifically designed to go after some of moammar gadhafi's air defense systems. overnight at some point, the military plane got into some mechanical problems and both of the crew members ejected. their chutes worked just fine but they landed in different places. the pilot was picked up by an osprey. that was sitting off the coast about a hundred miles on the "uss kearsarge." the marines, the 26 marine
a nationwide review to see if u.s. plants are vulnerable to the same type of earthquake that hit japan. the indian point station is about 25 miles from new york city has two operating nuclear reactors and it sits right on top of the ramapo fault line. the nrc filed a report uncovering a higher safety risk at the plant than previously thought. and that's gotten the attention of new york governor andrew cuomo, a long-time opponent of indian point. >> the world has changed. reevalua reevaluate. reevaluate and look at the situation and decide whether or not you should grant this facility a license today. with what you know today. >> now, we had a chance to speak with officials from energy corp. on our show last week. they say they welcome a safety review. 27 nuclear reactors, including indian point have been singled out for inspections by the nrc. allan chernoff has been granted exclusive access inside the indian point plant and we'll have his report coming up in the next hour of "american morning." >>> another morning of explosions in tripoli and heavy aircraft fire. as of last night, the
. they will not be successful doing so. >>> u.s. soldier jeremy morelock has pleaded guilty to charges he and other soldiers killed afghan citizens for sport last year. but morelock's possible life sentence was reduced to 24 years in a plea deal. german news magazines have published photographs showing morelock and other soldiers posing over the bodies of dead afghans. >>> allied attacks on tripoli are continuing into a sixth day. take a look at these pictures. they're from libyan state tv, and they reportedly show the destruction at a military base in tripoli. look at that fire raging. these were apparently filmed just after a coalition air strike. the coalition attacks on military targets have now grounded gadhafi's air force and crippled the country's air defenses. so strikes from now on are focusing more on ground troops as they move toward rebel-held towns to try and recapture them. >>> the libyan government says a number of civilians have been killed by coalition air strikes including women and children. to prove it, they bundled foreign reporter on it a convoy of buses to show them a house they said
from under a three-star general and it means that the u.s. will effectively now be taking a supportive role rather than the primary role in this operation going forward really just sending in reconnaissance and jamming planes rather than conducting a majority of the strike missions it has been and, of course, the cruise missiles. >> is it clear what would constitute success and when the operation would be over? >> reporter: that's at the moment is not clear, in fact, on the sunday talk shows in the united states, secretary of defense and the secretary of state were asked that kind of thing and could give no collar indication of whether this be a question of weeks, months or whether it would be over by the end of the year so we are hoping for more details as the day progresses but i think it's hard to ascertain how long this campaign might continue, zain. >> cnn diana magnay reporting, thanks, diana. >>> another look at how the rebels advanced. operation held areas are here marked in yellow. areas under control are marked in green. on friday the rebels were in control of benghazi. colon
stated that it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools in addition to our military efforts to support that policy. >> the american people from the congress need to hear what our president believes his objectives are. if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare a war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. these are things that must be debated here in washington apart from paris or at least encounters with other countries in which we say we'll hold your coat. we don't object to what you are up to. >>> good morning. welcome to morning joe. beautiful shot. times square. beautiful because i'm not there. i'm in dallas. mika is in the south of france trying to gather a feeling of the people in that beautiful part of the country. a story breaking suggesting that america, the united kingdom upset with the french leadership for overreaching. we are going to talk to mike barnicle about that. visiting professor, harlds ford junior and the great willie geist. pat buchanan and the host of
difficulties with that connection. >>> gruesome new details about a group of rogue u.s. soldiers on trial for murdering afghan civilians. "rolling stone" magazine publishing photos taken by a tank unit who call themselves the kill team. the shocking pictures you sigh here show the soldiers posing next to their kill, allegedly innocent and defenseless afghans. m mick, the pentagon trying to keep these pictures from the light of day. what's your reaction? >> the reality here is that the u.s. military, the army, first came upon this story almost a year ago when one of the soldiers of that so-called rogue squad there in afghanistan reported the fact that some of the soldiers in the unit had allegedly killed innocent afghan civilians. and in the course of that investigation, it was army investigators who actually uncovered 4,000 photos taken by soldiers. the vast majority of them happy snaps as you would see as if you were on vacation somewhere, but there were about 100, 120 or so showing dead bodies there in afghanistan, totally against afghanistan regulation. but the most egregious part abou
are overwhelmed. >>> in sendai, japan, there are signs of recovery. u.s. marines are busy there helping to clear away cars and other debris left in the tsunami's wake. >> we've been clearing it for the past few days, so we're making good progress. >>> let's head to tokyo and nbc's lee cowan who's developing stories there. >> reporter: it all stems from the injuries to the workers we talked about yesterday, the ones that were in the basement level of unit number three. they were trying to strip a cable there. they came in contact with radioactive water and had to be taken to the water. they were actually transferred to a hospital here in tokyo today so they could monitor their condition a little more closely. the consider is that the radiation levels were so high, and the water they stepped in, some 10,000 times that it should be, that the fear is now there is some kind of leak at the reactor itself. they don't know whether it's an actual breach in the core or the pipes themselves that are leaking but something is leaking. we don't know how much or how long it's been leaking and we don't know why
and exit strategy. talking about the same thing. what does it mean when the u.s. pulls back? nato allies are saying they don't have a plan in place to take over for the u.s. and one stumbling block. what happens to colonel gadhafi if he stays in power after this bombardment and pressure what then does the u.s. do? they have made clear that the u.n. resolution authorizing this in the eyes of the white house does not call for regime change and pushing gadhafi out. the white house wants him to go and the president said if he doesn't leave, then what, carol? >> so many up answered questions. ed henry, live at the white house, thanks so much. >>> more anti-government protests taking place taking places throughout the world. yemen legislature voted in favor of a state of emergency and vote came despite an appeal from government opponents who say it could lead to a new, quote, massacre. >>> syria, 15 people were killed during protests demanding government reforms. the u.s. state department says it is deeply troubled by these civilian deaths. syrian state television says the governor of the prov
. as of right now it appears that u.s. warplanes will still lead the more difficult mission, attacking the gadhafi ground forces. nbc's jim maceda is live. and richard engel live from the town offage agefag agfag agfafe . >>> we're getting confirmation three months plus or mys now. obviously there'll be adjustments. that mission should begin early next week. there will be dozens of planes from 28 nato countries including the two arab countries, qatar and the eub. right now nato is going to decide on sunday, no latter than tuesday on those two missions, the no-fly zone patrol obviously but also that they be caring out those air-to-ground strikes or will it keep it the way things are and have that done by the u.s.-led coalition. also the no-fly zones by the gadhafi forces. # in reality that's probably two or three fighter jets. there were air strikes, andrea, in tripoli overnight. a number of explosions. after the first time in a week they could another hear the artillery fire in the skies. also there's an ongoing war of the air waves if you will. the latest being a funeral. many of the
. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanwhile, more traces of radiation have been found in the u.s., raising new concerns. today in california one of
their sites on qaddafi's hometown of surt. just the same, a top u.s. military official says the rebels are not a robust fighting force and their gains may not be permanent. mandy clark is with the rebels in ras lanuf. >> this could be the midwest decisive battle yet in libya's civil war. in the span of just 48 hours, the ragtag army of students, laborers and some soldiers once loyal to the regime are now threatening qaddafi's hometown. the push west would have been impossible without coalition air strikes that pounded qaddafi's tanks and troops and trapped rebels in ajdabiya. allied air raids forced the regime's army into full retreat, allowing the rebels to retake control of the key oil hubs of brega and ras lanuf. despite those gains, these men are moving cautiously. they want to avoid traps set by qaddafi's forces. the first push to tripoli ended here in bin jiwad. rebels, believing residents were on their side, were led into a deadly ambush. now they say they've learned from that costly mistake. rebels say they're now doing clearing operations. >> ( translated ): we have learned to
to libya, gene cretz talking to the opposition chief. >> >> a u.s. officials confirmed the authenticity of the call, but would not comment on the query about weapons. hillary clinton is speaking to the opposition, too. >> we are reaching out to the opposition inside and outside of libya. i will be meeting with some of those figures both here in the united states and when i travel next week to discuss what more the united states and others can do. >> reporter: but moammar gadhafi and is spokesman's son show no signs of caving into pressure. >> the libyan peet will never, ever welcome nato, will never, ever welcome americans here. libya is not a piece of cake. we are n-- >> this is a kind of stalemate back and forth, but i think longer term, that the regime will prevail. >> jill dougherty reporting for us from the state department. we'll have a lot more on what general clapper, head of the national -- director of national intelligence had to say. this note, though, i have been invited to travel with secretary clinton on her overseas trip next week. i'll be reporting on critical talks abou
will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's at stake in libya for the united states? the white house is promising, perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more se
of the house of representatives are troubled that u.s. military resources were committed to war without clearly defining for the american people, the congress, and our troops what the mission in libya is and what america's role is in achieving that mission. what should the president do now? should he address the nation? should he meet with members of congress? all of the above? >> maybe all of the above. and i think the way boehner handled that letter was very thoughtful. he waited until the president was back on u.s. soil. as i understand the congressional briefings to date, what happened was bill burns, who's our undersecretary of state for policy briefed the senate on thursday afternoon as they were leaving town. on friday, the president convened the leadership of congress. however, it was a recess day. so most of them were hicked in te telephonically and the telephone didn't work so well. maybe he should have sent a plane to pick them up. but in any event, that briefing was not fully satisfactory. some members said, well, we're just going to be in the back of the line and we're not going to
, but despite eight days of bombing the u.s. says military ground forces loyal to president gadhafi still pose a significant threat. on monday, president obama will address the nation on the libyan crisis. >>> disaster in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in
said that the u.s. should not intervene every time there's a world crisis but this is not a moment to stand idly by and the president will address the nation about libya on monday night. cnn will bring it to you live with coverage here in the united states. while the focus is on libya, another country is seeing the marketings or the makings of an uprising of its own. a man holding american citizenship living in syria made a confession of trying to sell information to israel. his brother says it is not true and we'll tell you why he says his brother is made an example of by the syrian government. that is next. >>> may be the best movie you have heard of. that's according to roger ebert. he loves it and thousands of people on facebook. >>> you have a voice on the show. check out the social media account. we like to see your feedback. i'm good about washing my face. but sometimes i wonder... what's left behind? [ female announcer ] introducing purifying facial cleanser from neutrogena® naturals. developed with dermatologists... it's clinically proven to remove 99% of dirt and toxins
in libya face more setbacks in the push against moammar gadhafi's forces. u.s. president barack obama says he will not rule out arming the rebels. >>> a decisive moment in syria, the world is waiting to hear what the president will say one day after his cabinet quit. bashar assad will "face the nation" and has been lying low after two weeks of violent clashes between security forces and anti-government protests. thousands have been killed. and they poured into the capital tuesday. it is said the president could be about to lift the emergency law in place since 1963. he will bring you the address live as soon as it begins. >> right now, we're joined by hala gorani. you interviewed the spokesman from the embassy. good to see you. did he say anything about what we can expect bashar to say? >> we have spoken to embassy members and others and we are expecting bashar al-assad to lift the state of emergency that has been in place longer than he has been alive, 1962, the baathi baathi baathist coup that brought them in power. it won't happen in syria concretely until it does. you have critics who
. officials says the u.s. launched 15 more tomahawk missiles in the last 24 hours this around tripoli. there were also new coalition air strikes against gadhafi's artillery and tank positions, including those vowing to overtake the key rebel-held city of ajdabiya in eastern libya. u.s. officials tell nbc news the u.s. could hand over the lead role to nato as soon as tomorrow. it appears for now u.s. warplanes will lead the difficult mission of attacking gadhafi's ground forces that could threaten libyan civilians. mike viqueira joins us live from the white house. we just learned president obama should be holding a conference call with members of congress. what are you hearing? >> reporter: that's right. jay carney appeared in the briefing room 12 minutes and informed us the president conducted a national security council meeting on the situation in libya this morning, and starting right about now, 2:00, it was scheduled to begin. the president will be calling congressional leaders, a conference call, where he will, quote, consult with them on the situation in libya. and of course, the
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
hear last week, general carter hamm leading the u.s. effort there to enforce the no-fly zone, describing misrata specifically and saying it was very difficult to know exactly where the opposition was, exactly where the government was, exactly where the civilians were and exactly where these heavy weapons were because they are hideing in houses. as we drove out of misrata yesterday we saw soldiers with their vehicles hiding inside buildings, inside buildings. they had driven in through the store fronts and hiding inside the stores and the tanks hiding under trees, so this makes it very, very hard for aircraft to see these heavy weapons and to target them easily without the fear of injuring civilians and that is the challenge that these aircraft flying overhead are facing right now, carol. >> nic robertson reporting live in tripoli, thanks. >>> president obama goes on television to face a war weary nation that would be our own, he says ignoring moammar gadhafi threats of slaughtering civilians would have betrayed our values as americans, but he said using the military to force
it comes to how the u.s. would get involved in, say, a syria or a yemen or pbahrain. it seems as if officials today, the whole goal of this briefing was to make sure reporters understood that libya was not a precedent for anything. >> well, it was very striking this weekend on "meet the press" to watch secretary gates and secretary clinton trying to define first from the defense secretary, defining what is in our national interests. this was gates first and then clinton. >> no, i don't think it's vital interest for the united states, but we clearly have interests there and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> i think a lot of people would hear that and say that's quite striking. not in our vital interests and yet we're committing military resources to it. >> but then it wouldn't be fair to what bob just said. did hib ilibya attack us? no, they did not attack us. >> but they did have interest with our allies and our allies have been standing with the united states in afghanistan for a decade when they were not attacked. so that's the cas
monday night to explain the u.s. role in libya. and this morning in his weekly radio address, he defended sending forces there, and said the mission has been a success. david kerley is at the white house. david, the president appears to have gone on the offense, taking a lot of heat from both sides. >> reporter: he has taken a lot of criticism. you're starting to see the rollout this morning of the message from this white house that this is going well. and trying to explain to the american people what the president hopes to accomplish in libya. the weekly address today. tomorrow, you'll see the secretary of state and the defense secretary, on the sunday shows. and the speech by the president on monday night. the president spoke to 21 members of congress on a conference call, trying to nullify their concerns last night. >> and nato is supposed to take over libya tomorrow. how involved will the u.s. be in day-to-day operations there? >> reporter: that's a message that has not been very clear. the president says the u.s. is moving back from the leadership role as nato takes over. but the u.s
that the u.s. should establish a no-fly zone over libya. >> what would you do about libya? >> exercise a no-fly zone this evening. communicate to the libyan military that gadhafi was gone. and that the sooner they switch sides, the more likely they were to survive. provide help to the rebels to replace him. this this is a moment to get rid of him, do it, get it over with. the united states doesn't need anybody's permission. >> do you think moammar gadhafi has to go as a result of intervention. >> i would not have intervened. i think there are allies in the region that we could have worked with. i would not have used american and european forces. >> all right. >> wait, wait, wait. i don't understand that. hold on. >> he says on his facebook page that the two statements are not a contradiction. believe that. and that the bottom line is that he wishes the u.s. military hadn't gotten involved militarily. >> let's go to ouring inning nh desk at 30 rock. mikey, in that first clip with greta -- >> come on, mike. >> he did not talk about throwing the kitchen sink at gadhafi. everything else was th
very much. a week into the campaign the u.s. role in libya is about to change. nato will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone but rebels and pro-gadhafi forces are fighting it out street to street. nbc's richard engel is one of the first journalists to reach ajdabiya where there are battles raging now. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. rebels have taken about half of this city. gadhafi's forces still contain pockets and have tanked positioned around the edges. we have seen street-to-street fighting. we can hear gunfire now. rebels have been taking cover, firing machine guns, trying to find gadhafi's forces and drive them out. this is what the war in libya has become. the western air strikes will take out gadhafi's heavy weapons, tanks, aircraft and allow the rebels to push into cities themselves and fight it out almost hand to hand with gadhafi's forces in several cities in libya. >> you talk hand to hand. i was struck on thursday by your reporting and how poorly equipped the rebels seemed to be in terms of weapons. are you sai seeing indications that they are being supp
life. for a woman in any country, in the u.s., egypt, libya, to come out and say she was raped. no one would do that unless they were raped especially in a conservative society. human rights watch have said girls and women who are survivors of rape are taken to because of the shame associated with rape. and these are centers where the girls and women are held as prisoners basically because -- >> they're not rehabilitated. >> social rehabilitation centers. >> held away from the rest of society. >> they're practically prisoners. >> that's the part that's most amazing. you've told you that sources say she's being held still even though they claim she's been set free. >> her mother and relatives have appeared on television and said that libyan officials have told them if she retracts the story, they'll release her. but gives me hope she's alive. but i won't believe she's alive until i see her. i was a journalist in libya, i went with a group of journalists in 1996, and they kept us in a hotel practically prisoners of gadha gadhafi's ministry of information. and during a news conference bec
their leader leave now. what does all this mean for the u.s. war on terror? >>> asleep in the tower. troubling questions about who is keeping watch at the nation's other airports as officials now confirm an air traffic controller was napping on the job. >>> it's friday. so do you have your office beer ready? apparently booze in the workplace is making a comeback. could it actually make us more productive? >>> we begin with the devastate nug develop in japan, radioactive contamination from the troubled fukushima nuclear power plant more severe than first thought. japan's prime minister spoke just a short time ago, calling the situation there very grave and serious. nuclear safety officials now suspect a dangerous breach in the core of a reactor. the evacuation zone has expanded from a 12-mile radius. people who are up to 19 miles mr. the plant are being told to leave. >>> also this morning, japan's police agency says the official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami has now topped 10,000. more than 17,000 are listed as missing. >>> let's go live to tokyo, nbc's lee cowan is there. lee, wh
session of the u.s. congress. and i said that the single greatest threat facing the world and my own country was the arming of iran with nuclear weapons. and since then what i've been trying to do is to alert the world and the leaders of the world that it's not merely our problem, that it's their problem because iran today is -- in afghanistan, it's in iraq, it's gotten control of lebanon. it's gotten control of half the palestinian society -- >> do they have weapons, do you think? >> it's working to get them. >> how close do you think they are? >> i think they're getting a lot closer. >> should they be transparent about their nuclear program? >> even to the extent that they are transparent, it's very clear what they're doing. they're -- they've enriched enough material now almost for three nuclear bombs. they industrial to reenrich it again, but that's what they're doing. they -- they're building long-range cbcs, icbms, they don't need to do that. >> what about the country that is arming itself to the teeth, possibly getting nuclear weapons, and you're its number-one target. what ar
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